About Us

Our philosophy and unique approach

Ocean Giants Trust differs from most other international NGOs. We emphasise the importance of integrating and applying international scientific research with local conservation and education, by partnering with local conservation groups.

Ocean Giants Trust, unlike the majority of organisations, does not put its own staff in charge of operations, instead the management and ultimate ownership of project rest with local conservation groups. Ocean Giants Trust is strongly opposed to “green colonialism”.

Ocean Giants Trust assists with technical expertise, such as marketing, fundraising and publicity when requested, but wherever possible supports the development of local expertise, by funding study tours and training.

Ocean Giants Trust encourages small-scale, sustainable development, so that projects can become financially independent. This is in contrast to many international projects which attract lavish initial funding, but then require annual aid in order to continue.

Ocean Giants Trust believes that it is important to be able to quantify results, and demonstrate to our donors and stakeholders that a real difference is possible, and is being made.

Ocean Giants Trust does not hoard reserves of cash, overheads are low because we are administered entirely by volunteers, but we will keep enough to pay essential bills; we believe Ocean Giants Trust should spend as much as possible on research, conservation and education projects which contribute to saving Ocean Giants from extinction.

Our organisational values

Innovation

Innovation

We spearhead new solutions and advocate improvement in current approaches

Collaboration

Collaboration

We seek partnerships with international and local organizations to achieve our aims

Achievement

Achievement

We seek to implement long-lasting solutions on both regional and community levels

Education

Education

We strive to expand the knowledge of all stakeholders and ourselves

Passion

Passion

We retain our passion and determination to succeed even in the face of adversity

Adventure

Adventure

Our team culture preserves a spirit of adventure and enables personal and professional growth

Support Ocean Giants Trust

If you would like to donate to the ongoing work of Ocean Giants Trust, please give here to help us in our mission to save Ocean Giants from extinction.

Whether you set up a monthly payment or want to make a single donation, your support will help to enable projects that focus on research and education that drives the conservation of marine megafauna species.

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  • Christmas is just around the corner. (Yay!) Before you start wrapping all those presents for family and friends, take a moment to consider just how much plastic and non-recyclable materials you’re using! Have a look at some of these creative ideas and have a waste-free Christmas 🎄
Credit: unknown. 
#plasticfree #recycle #reducereuserecycle #christmas #saveourplanet #saveouroceans #plasticfreechristmas
  • Repost from @thomaspeschak: “A whale shark and its entourage of yellow juvenile jacks traverse the western reaches of the Indian Ocean. In the vastness of open sea, very large fish, like whale sharks and marine mammals, often attract a community of much smaller animals that live within their orbit. The reasons for this are varied, but include indirect physical protection, an easy ride in their giant’s slipstream (or on their bow wave) and morsels of food from messy eaters like predatory sharks. I personally have not observed it, but I would guess they have to be vigilant to prevent being inadvertently hoovered up as part of the whale shark’s daily plankton meals.”
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#oceangiants #whalesharks #ogt #sharks #sharkeducation #uwphotography
  • @lamaveproject have a new publication out, highlighting the negative impact of whale shark tourism in Oslob, Philippines on the local coral reef ecosystem. .
“The findings highlight the urgency of shifting towards more sustainable tourism practices to ensure the conservation and restoration of healthy marine ecosystems”. .
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Find the article on Lamave’s Facebook page or website. .
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#philippines #oslob #cebu #research #science #sharkscience #whaleshark #tourism #conservation #oceangiants #ogt #lamave
  • The stomach contents of a dead whale, which was washed up near Kapota Island in the Wakatobi National Park, Indonesia. ❗️Swipe to see park officials examining the whale on November 20th 2018. 🔹Its stomach was found to contain nearly 6kg (13lbs) of plastic waste, including:
hard plastic - 19 pieces, 140g 
plastic bottles - 4 pieces, 150g
plastic bags - 25 pieces, 260g 
flip-flops - 2 pieces, 270g 
plastic cups - 115 pieces, 750g
pieces of string - 3.26kg
🔸Credit: Reuters/Kartika Sumolang 
Via: @theeconomist.
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#whale#environment #Indonesia #plasticpollution#plastic #sea #wildlife #saveouroceans #plasticfree #oceangiants #ogt