About Us

Our philosophy and unique approach

Ocean Giants Trust differs from most other international NGOs. We emphasise the importance of integrating and applying international scientific research with local conservation and education, by partnering with local conservation groups.

Ocean Giants Trust, unlike the majority of organisations, does not put its own staff in charge of operations, instead the management and ultimate ownership of project rest with local conservation groups. Ocean Giants Trust is strongly opposed to “green colonialism”.

Ocean Giants Trust assists with technical expertise, such as marketing, fundraising and publicity when requested, but wherever possible supports the development of local expertise, by funding study tours and training.

Ocean Giants Trust encourages small-scale, sustainable development, so that projects can become financially independent. This is in contrast to many international projects which attract lavish initial funding, but then require annual aid in order to continue.

Ocean Giants Trust believes that it is important to be able to quantify results, and demonstrate to our donors and stakeholders that a real difference is possible, and is being made.

Ocean Giants Trust does not hoard reserves of cash, overheads are low because we are administered entirely by volunteers, but we will keep enough to pay essential bills; we believe Ocean Giants Trust should spend as much as possible on research, conservation and education projects which contribute to saving Ocean Giants from extinction.

Our organisational values

Innovation

Innovation

We spearhead new solutions and advocate improvement in current approaches

Collaboration

Collaboration

We seek partnerships with international and local organizations to achieve our aims

Achievement

Achievement

We seek to implement long-lasting solutions on both regional and community levels

Education

Education

We strive to expand the knowledge of all stakeholders and ourselves

Passion

Passion

We retain our passion and determination to succeed even in the face of adversity

Adventure

Adventure

Our team culture preserves a spirit of adventure and enables personal and professional growth

Support Ocean Giants Trust

If you would like to donate to the ongoing work of Ocean Giants Trust, please give here to help us in our mission to save Ocean Giants from extinction.

Whether you set up a monthly payment or want to make a single donation, your support will help to enable projects that focus on research and education that drives the conservation of marine megafauna species.

Donate Now
  • Repost: @sharkeducation •  The scales of sharks are called dermal denticles which translates to "skin teeth." This gives sharks a rough texture and but also hydrodynamic power. Oceanic Whitetip sharks (Carcharhinus longimanus) have dermal denticles that lay relatively flat and with 5-7 ridges. These broad scales only overlap slightly leaving some skin exposed. This gives them a smoother texture than other sharks. (Castro 2011)⠀
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Castro, J.I. (2011). The Sharks of North America. Oxford University Press, USA: pp. 438-440.⠀
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📷 Terri Roberts⠀@sharklady01
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#oceanicwhitetip #whitetip #scales #sharkscales #sharkfacts #openocean #science#ogt #oceangiants #marinebiology #sharkscience
  • We think this whale shark photo is epic! 
Repost: @gonzo_araujo • 
The whale shark is the world's largest fish, and recent estimates put their maximum growth to 19.4 m, how crazy is that?! Pretty big indeed! In the Philippines most whale sharks are between 4 and 6 m, with the largest occurring in Donsol, Sorsogon. Have you seen a big whale shark before?!
This 📷 was taken in Southern Leyte last January with @lamaveproject and @siren_fleet (trip Jan 2020!)
#whaleshark #fact #Philippines #ogt #oceangiants #shark #funfactfriday
  • Thanks to a pioneering partnership between Ocean Giants Trust and @plymuni, a series of scholarships have been awarded to marine biology and conservation undergraduates.

The first Ocean Giants Scholars will get to complement their studies by working alongside charities based in locations such as Mexico, Mozambique, the Philippines and Tanzania for the next three years.

This will include a placement during the students’ third year, when they will get the chance to travel and see the charities' work first hand.

The five scholars, and their selected deputies, will also work with the Trust to set up their own charity to support the organisations, and ensure the partnership becomes self-sustaining in the future.

@lamaveproject @marinemegafauna @mantamexicocaribe 
Sea Sense. 
Photo: @simonjpierce
  • “Something to bare in mind this summer! 😎 
Researchers found that the chemical oxybenzone has toxic effects on young coral that causes endocrine disruption, DNA damage and death of coral, among other the problems. Oxybenzone also exacerbates coral bleaching which has been particularly prevalent in recent years due to rising sea temperatures.

Currently, somewhere between 4,000 and 6,000 tons of sunscreen enters coral reef areas around the world each year... That’s a lot of sunscreen considering how little it takes to cause toxic effects. 
Sunscreen is part of a long list of threats to coral reefs that includes pollution, overfishing and climate change. Beyond their impressive appearance, coral reefs play an important role for local communities and the world at large. For one, they contribute to local economies through tourism and sustain ecosystems where people can fish. Reefs also protect the global environment by serving as carbon sinks, absorbing carbon dioxide that would otherwise contribute to global warming.” http://time.com/4080985/sunscreen-coral-reefs/

Infographic: @gilisharkconservation 
Repost: Shark Fest UK •

#sunscreen #suncream #summer #sunburn #suntan #coralreef #ecofriendly