About Us

Our philosophy and unique approach

Ocean Giants Trust differs from most other international NGOs. We emphasise the importance of integrating and applying international scientific research with local conservation and education, by partnering with local conservation groups.

Ocean Giants Trust, unlike the majority of organisations, does not put its own staff in charge of operations, instead the management and ultimate ownership of project rest with local conservation groups. Ocean Giants Trust is strongly opposed to “green colonialism”.

Ocean Giants Trust assists with technical expertise, such as marketing, fundraising and publicity when requested, but wherever possible supports the development of local expertise, by funding study tours and training.

Ocean Giants Trust encourages small-scale, sustainable development, so that projects can become financially independent. This is in contrast to many international projects which attract lavish initial funding, but then require annual aid in order to continue.

Ocean Giants Trust believes that it is important to be able to quantify results, and demonstrate to our donors and stakeholders that a real difference is possible, and is being made.

Ocean Giants Trust does not hoard reserves of cash, overheads are low because we are administered entirely by volunteers, but we will keep enough to pay essential bills; we believe Ocean Giants Trust should spend as much as possible on research, conservation and education projects which contribute to saving Ocean Giants from extinction.

Our organisational values

Innovation

Innovation

We spearhead new solutions and advocate improvement in current approaches

Collaboration

Collaboration

We seek partnerships with international and local organizations to achieve our aims

Achievement

Achievement

We seek to implement long-lasting solutions on both regional and community levels

Education

Education

We strive to expand the knowledge of all stakeholders and ourselves

Passion

Passion

We retain our passion and determination to succeed even in the face of adversity

Adventure

Adventure

Our team culture preserves a spirit of adventure and enables personal and professional growth

Support Ocean Giants Trust

If you would like to donate to the ongoing work of Ocean Giants Trust, please give here to help us in our mission to save Ocean Giants from extinction.

Whether you set up a monthly payment or want to make a single donation, your support will help to enable projects that focus on research and education that drives the conservation of marine megafauna species.

Donate Now
  • @mantamexicocaribe are raising vital funds for their upcoming project operations this year. .

You can donate, volunteer or buy manta-y souvenirs via their online shop (link is in their bio). Support this amazing project today! .
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#manta #mantaray #research #science #marinebiology #marineconservation #saveouroceans
  • This here is a lemon shark, spotted just off of Heron Island, Australia. • DYK that lemons are very social species, often seen in groups & have a structured hierarchy system based on size & sex. • They get their name from their unusual colouring, which helps camouflage them against the sandy sea floor. • They often hunt together, in what is known as a “feeding frenzy”, attacking prey in a coordinated group. .
Photo: @alexkyddphoto 🤙🏼
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#oceangiants #ogt #oceangiantstrust #shark #lemonshark #sharkfacts #sharkresearch #marinebiology #marineconservation
  • Repost from @marinemegafauna:
Wilma has seen many tourists in her life. And she has the scars to show for it.
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The dangers faced by #whalesharks like Wilma, #dolphins, #turtles and other marine animals from irresponsible wildlife tourism are growing every day.
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As the number of people clamouring to hey closer to these beautiful animals increases, so does the number is clashes between humans and wildlife.
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Help MMF protect them: www.marinemegafaunafoundation.org/support-us
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#oceangiants #ogt #mmf #oceangiantstrust #whaleshark #ecotourism #tourism #research #marinebiology #shark #marineconservation #sharkresearch
  • DYK there are 9 different species of mobula (or devil) rays? 
They can dive to depths of nearly 2000m (6500ft) when feeding and can perform surface acrobatics when communicating. 
They are ovoviviparous, meaning they give birth live young, and mums can be pregnant for over 2 years. 
We think they’re pretty incredible. 
Photo: @toddthimios .
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#oceangiants #ogt #oceangiantstrust #mobularays #devilrays #marinebiology #research #conservation